We electrify materials to create nanostructures,

and we materialize electrochemistry to store energy

Qing Chen, HKUST, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Nanoporous Metal

    Materials displaying fascinating evolution mechanisms and structure-property relationships

    Bicontinuous porous metal evolves from either dealloying, the selective dissolution of an alloy, or decomposition, that of a compound. We study the morphology evolution leading to nanoporous metals, understand structure-property relationships, and apply them to design electrochemical devices.

Energy Storage in Organic Molecules

   Low-cost organic materials to store energy with their redox reactions, in Li-ion or redox flow batteries. 

    To store intermittent solar and wind energy in a grid, we exploit low-cost organic materials that are chemically and electrochemically reversible upon redox reactions for applications in Li-ion and redox flow batteries. 

Structural Evolution of Electrodes

    In-situ characterization of high-capacity electrodes to tackle stability issues. 

    Charge transfer in a high-capacity electrode brings drastic structural changes. As they all start at the electrode/electrolyte interface, we characterize it with in-situ with electrochemical AFM and STM, with the aim of designing an electrode structure that lasts longer. 

 

    Prof. Qing Chen is an Assistant Professor in both the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Department of Chemistry, HKUST. As a core member of the Energy Institute, he works on materials for energy storage, and teaches an undergraduate course on Materials for Energy Technologies.

    Prof. Qing Chen was born in Wenzhou, China. He holds a bachelor degree in Polymer Science from Zhejiang University and a PhD degree in Materials Science from the Arizona State University. Prior to joining Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), he had his postdoctoral training at Harvard University.

    He is currently affiliated with both the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Department of Chemistry, HKUST. As a core member of the Energy Institute, he works on materials for energy storage, and teaches an undergraduate course on Materials for Energy Technologies.

Group Alumni

Yifan Xu - Research Assistant (with Prof. YK Lee)

 
News
Our recent contribution to the work on the lithium-sulfur battery of Prof. Tianshou Zhao's group is in press. >> link
Two of our recent work now online @ ACS Applied Materials and Interface >> link, and Nature Communications. >> link
Congcheng's work on our new fabrication approach towards nanoporous metals is a top download last month in Chem. Mater.
>> view the list of top downloads
We co-organized a workshop on energy storage (funded by the Croucher Foundation), during which prominent lecturers discussed the future of energy research. >> link
Publications
Ren, Y. et al. Rational design of spontaneous reactions for protecting porous lithium electrodes in lithium–sulfur batteries. Nature Comm. (2019). 
>> view full text
Xu, Y, Zheng, Y., Wang, C., Chen, Q. An All-Organic Aqueous Battery Powered by Adsorbed Quinone. ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces (2019).
>> view full text
Wang, C, Chen, Q. Reduction-Induced Decomposition: Spontaneous Formation of Monolithic Nanoporous Metals of Tunable Structural Hierarchy and Porosity. Chem. Mater. (2018). >> view full text
Chen, Q., Ding, Y. & Chen, M. Nanoporous metal by dealloying for electrochemical energy conversion and storage. MRS Bull. 43, 43–48 (2018). 
>> view full text
A full list of publications at
 

​Contact Us

Email:  chenqing at ust.hk   

CYT 4005, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology,

Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong